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This is a 1 credit lab course in conjunction with the physical sciences lectures. This course aims to enable students to emplement theoretical knowledge and concepts they learn in practical experiments, and hopes to teach students key lab skills. 

This is a 1 credit lab course, in conjunction with SCI-101 Life sciences. It aims to apply theoretical concepts learnt in life sciences to practical experiments, with the aim of teaching students key lab skills. 

Hands-on practice in historical research

Public Choice Economics uses economic tools and methods to analyze how politics and government work. The course questions how individuals make collective choices, why do we have a government, how do voters, politicians, and bureaucrats behave in the public sphere. It demonstrates that voters, politicians, and government officials respond the incentives they face. The course examines how these players’ actions, as responses to the incentives that they face, lead to political, economic, and social outcomes in the democratic political process. These outcomes vary depending upon the rule structures and constitutions within which politicians and bureaucrats operate. Therefore, these outcomes and structures are compared with one another and emphasis is placed on real world outcomes. The class covers topics such as difficulties of collective action by large groups, rent-seeking activities of interest groups (or concentrated groups), voters’ behavior under different voting systems, collective choice within government, effects of legislative structures on policy outcomes, behavior of bureaucracy, and regulation.


This course is an examination of the integration of computing technologies, systems analysis design practices, and management criteria in the design of large-scale information management and decision-support systems, includes case studies and computing lab. This course also examines how managerial and analytic functions in public and private organizations can be performed via various computer-based applications, and provides in-depth coverage of selected decision support package.

Project Management is now a key concern of many major companies particularly those that operate under a project oriented structure. This course provides the student with the skills expected of a Project Manager. The course covers key components of project management including project integration, project scope management, project time and cost management, quality management, human resource considerations, communications, risk management, and procurement management.

This course is an examination of the integration of computing technologies, systems analysis design practices, and management criteria in the design of large-scale information management and decision-support systems, includes case studies and computing lab. This course also examines how managerial and analytic functions in public and private organizations can be performed via various computer-based applications, and provides in-depth coverage of selected decision support package.

Project Management is now a key concern of many major companies particularly those that operate under a project oriented structure.  This course provides the student with the skills expected of a Project Manager.  The course pays particular attention to the skills relevant to IT projects but is general in nature. 

The course is an introduction to computer-aided design (CAD). This course will introduce graphical communication as a tool in documenting the results of an engineering design. Emphasis is placed on the use of Computer Aided Drafting and 3-D Solid Modeling systems to prepare working drawings packages of basic components and assemblies. Students combine the practice of sketching along with computer-based solid modeling to produce a parametric design. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to prepare working drawings, with appropriate views, dimensions, title blocks, and bill of materials.

This course should be taken by all AUIS students as part the core program. This is a two-hour/credit course with no prerequisites. The lab component of the course, SCIL 101, is also a mandatory course for all the AUIS students and should be registered separately from the lecture component. The lab and the lecture courses are co-requisites.

 

This course will examine the unifying biological principles that govern life on the planet Earth. The unifying principles of biology will be applied to explore the basic structures and processes of living organism: their classification; the processes that govern their structure and function at multiple scales; their mechanisms of reproduction, inheritance and evolution; and their interactions with the external environment. Through class discussions students will also consider the methods by which scientists observe natural phenomena, test hypotheses using inductive and deductive reasoning, analyze and interpret scientific data, and synthesize the resulting knowledge to understand biological diversity.



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