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This course emphasizes the materials and processes used in manufacturing. Fundamentals include the properties, structure and nature of materials for manufactured goods, such as ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys, plastics, composites and ceramics, and the selection of materials for various functions.

ENGR 358 Mechanics of Materials Fall Semester 2020
Introductory course in mechanics of materials that covers material, load-stress-strain relationships, axial load, deformations, torsion, bending and shearing stresses, and deflections of beams, shafts and transverse shear.

The course mainly focuses on the importance of the Dynamics in our life and deals with the fundamentals of it. It covers the types of motion of the moving bodies by simplifying the model on particles. Then it covers the dragging force behind the motion interpreting those motion forces using Newton’s Second Law of motion. Finally, it covers the dynamic properties of the rigid bodies and vibrating object both (Free and Forced vibration) in both (undamped and damped) cases.


This course covers the basic concepts of finance including the time value of money, capital budgeting, cost of capital, tradeoffs between risk and return, basic portfolio models, and the capital asset pricing model. Other topics include debt and equity markets, valuation of securities, capital structure, dividend policy, working capital management, and capital restructuring.

Course Description

Corruption is seen as undermining national and global development and the legitimacy of governments and businesses. Corruption could also be a main obstacle for a country’s transition to democracy. This course will focus on defining corruption and identifying its causes, types and consequences, as well as approaches and policies of combating corruption.

Prerequisites: Sophomore status or above.

 

Course Learning Outcomes

1.     Critical Thinking: Consider problems in a clear, reasoned manner that is informed by evidence, and recognizes bias.

2.     Critical Reading: Analyze, interpret, and synthesize diverse sources of information.

3.     Communication: Engage in intellectual debate and present ideas and arguments in a clear, logical manner in writing and speech.

4.     Research: Define and execute original research projects based on a solid understanding of social scientific theories and methods.

5.     Develop skills, frameworks and expertise that prepare students for professions related to governance and risk management.

 


Course Description

This course will investigate the vital link between people and places through a series of comparative case studies of critical issues facing our world. Students will discuss a broad range of these global issues thematically, including the impact of commerce, communication, culture, and our relationship to the environment. At the end, students will learn to add a spatial dimension to their analysis of major social and cultural phenomena affecting our world, both in the past and today.

 

Course Outcomes

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

 

1. Critical Reading: Analyze, interpret, and synthesize diverse sources of information.

2. Critical Thinking: Consider problems in a clear, reasoned manner that is informed by evidence and recognizes bias.

3. Communication: Engage in intellectual debate and present ideas and arguments in a clear, logical manner in writing and speech.

4. Regions: Understand worldviews, experiences, and power structures from a variety of societies, cultures, and time periods.

5. Contexts: Analyze the impact of regional or global economic, political, geographic, and historical developments on specific regions.

6. Theory: Evaluate theoretical approaches and research methods from various social science disciplines.

Students will gain an appreciation of geography in the social sciences from reading a series of comparative case studies from around the world. Their understanding of these case studies will be tested through a mid-term and final exam asking for short responses to geographic questions. Students will be asked to assess an argument in their first essay response (500 words). In the next essay response, they will have to explicitly compare the similarities and differences in two or more case studies (500 words). In a final essay response, the students will have to adapt their reasoning to a large geographical or social question addressed in the advanced readings (2000 words). The grade for the final essay is broken down into three stages: outline, draft, and final essay. Students will be judged on their ability to collect relevant data, organize their research findings, and support an argument with evidence. 10% of a student's grade is based on map quizzes.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from 1450 to the present. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will continue to develop skills in critical reading of primary texts.

 

Course Learning Outcomes

CIV 102 is the second in a four-semester sequence that is part of the Core Program.

 

Students completing this course will learn: 

      The epochs of human history, and the human action, thought, spirituality, and creativity that set each apart;

 

They will practice critical reasoning by:

      Comprehending the difference between opinion and knowledge, description and judgment;

      Understanding and analyzing arguments, and making sound arguments of their own;

      Joining cause to effect in the social world;

      Relating the past to the present and future.

 

And they will develop skills in:

      Translating their reasoning into speaking and writing

      Fitting their words to audience and circumstance;

      Using appropriate techniques and technology to further their intellectual and creative endeavors.

 

In CIV 102, students will continue to practices the skills learned in CIV 101, including:

      Take notes on class lectures, including both main themes and significant details;

      Read a textbook effectively, outlining main themes and recognizing significant details;

      Read primary sources critically, recognizing context and bias;

      Analyze visual sources in their historical context

 

In addition, in CIV 102, students will learn to:

      Describe major developments in world history from the fifteenth century to the present;

      Identify key events in modern world history;

      Analyze change, comparison, and connections in world history;

      Synthesize diverse sources of information, including primary and secondary written sources, and visual sources;

      Construct an argumentative thesis statement and support it with appropriate historical evidence.

 


Course Description

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from 1450 to the present. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will continue to develop skills in critical reading of primary texts.

 

Course Learning Outcomes

CIV 102 is the second in a four-semester sequence that is part of the Core Program.

 

Students completing this course will learn: 

      The epochs of human history, and the human action, thought, spirituality, and creativity that set each apart;

 

They will practice critical reasoning by:

      Comprehending the difference between opinion and knowledge, description and judgment;

      Understanding and analyzing arguments, and making sound arguments of their own;

      Joining cause to effect in the social world;

      Relating the past to the present and future.

 

And they will develop skills in:

      Translating their reasoning into speaking and writing

      Fitting their words to audience and circumstance;

      Using appropriate techniques and technology to further their intellectual and creative endeavors.

 

In CIV 102, students will continue to practices the skills learned in CIV 101, including:

      Take notes on class lectures, including both main themes and significant details;

      Read a textbook effectively, outlining main themes and recognizing significant details;

      Read primary sources critically, recognizing context and bias;

      Analyze visual sources in their historical context

 

In addition, in CIV 102, students will learn to:

      Describe major developments in world history from the fifteenth century to the present;

      Identify key events in modern world history;

      Analyze change, comparison, and connections in world history;

      Synthesize diverse sources of information, including primary and secondary written sources, and visual sources;

      Construct an argumentative thesis statement and support it with appropriate historical evidence.

 


CIV 203 tackles important questions regarding the human condition within their historical context. It examines how perceptions, ideas and social organizations have changed over time as well as the ways in which people in different places and times have sought to answer certain ‘big questions.’ Such questions transcend ‘civilizational’ divides and are part of our common humanity; hence, this course takes a comparative approach. Students will engage with questions that are relevant to present-day dilemmas in their society.



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