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This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society.

Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the Internet, as well as security, privacy, and intellectual property rights. This course focuses on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. This course is offered to all AUIS students and no prior computer experience is assumed.

This course introduces fundamentals of data structures and algorithms. Main topics include data structures such as lists, stacks, queues, arrays, trees, and other advanced data structures used in high level programming languages. Students will also engage in study of algorithmic techniques for hashing, sorting and searching, and the preliminary analysis of such algorithms to determine their complexity and efficiency. The students will implement the basic data structures to solve programming problems.

The live science course is all majors course

Good Afternoon,


Please add my course Engr 492 Design ll.


Thank you.


Regards,

Umer Javed, PhD




This course aims to provide a firm understanding of the basic principles of electricity, magnetism and electrodynamics. The main emphasis is on electromagnetism as it is the underlying theory for modern physics. A secondary emphasis is on applications of electricity and magnetism and its role in circuits, electronics and laboratory instruments. At the conclusion of the course the student should be comfortable with the use of Maxwell's equations in integral form, and be aware of the differential equation form. The physical phenomena connected with producing electricity should be thoroughly understood. The associated laboratory will demonstrate some of the material covered in the lectures, familiarize the student with electrical measurements, techniques and introduce new materials.

This course is an (calculus-based) introduction to Newtonian Mechanics. The course topics include introductory kinematics, dynamics, elasticity, Newtonian gravitation, fluids, and vibrations and waves. PHY 232 is also the first in a two-semester sequence required for all Engineering majors. There is a required weekly lab course which has to be taken in conjunction with this course.

This course is designed to provide a complete performing auditing. The objectives include principles and practices used by public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and supporting data.  This course is a study of techniques available for gathering, summarizing, analyzing and interpreting the data presented in financial statements and procedures used in verifying the fairness of the information. Also emphasizes legal aspects and considerations

This course covers the basic concepts of finance including the time value of money, valuation of securities, capital budgeting, cost of capital, tradeoffs between risk and return, basic portfolio models, and the capital asset pricing model.  Other topics include debt and equity markets, capital structure, dividend policy, and capital restructuring.

This is an introductory course of the basics of accounting principles and practices.  It covers the complete accounting cycle from analyzing accounting transactions to preparing and interpreting financial statements. “Accounting is the language of Business”


In this seminar, students will experiment as translators moving advanced level creative texts from Kurdish, Arabic, Turkish, and/or Farsi into English. They will move away from transliteration into translation, using English fluently and gracefully. Each student, after studying certain texts as a class, will design his or her own project to complete during the remainder of the semester. Students will, as a class, finish the semester in workshop, revising material to incorporate in the final portfolios, class anthology, and reading.


This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the Internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge-based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.


This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the Internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge-based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.



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